ICR Help

For reporting purposes, an incident is one or more offenses committed at the same time and place by an offender or group of offenders acting in concert. ICRs are used by police to document incidents and their related offenses. Not all offenses are publically searchable. Click here for a list of non-searchable offenses.

For privacy reasons, no name information is available. Similarly, only blocks or intersections where incidents occurred are available, not specific street addresses.

When requesting additional information for an incident it is helpful to provide the ICR number.

 

  • Crime category: A broad classification of crime, such as robbery or assault.
  • Date/Time: The date and time an offense occurred is identified by 2 fields, begin date/time and end date/time. If the exact date and time an incident occurred is known an incident will have a begin date/time but no end date/time. However, the exact time of an incident may not be known so a range covering the approximate time the incident is thought to have occurred is used. These incidents will have both a begin date/time and an end date/time.
  • Disposition: The investigative status of an offense falls into one of three categories:
    • Cleared by arrest – As the name implies, a suspect was arrested regarding the offense.
    • Cleared by exception – An offense is cleared by other than normal circumstances. For example, a suspect dies before being arrested.
    • Not cleared – The offense is currently unsolved.
  • ICR number (ICR #): A unique identifier for each incident. For reporting purposes, an incident is one or more offenses committed at the same time and place by an offender or group of offenders acting in concert. Since an incident can involve multiple offenses, each offense on an ICR is identifed with its own sequence number (Seq. #).
  • Magisterial district: Henrico is divided into 5 magisterial districts. To access a map of these districts click here. Note, this link requires Adobe Acrobat and may take a few minutes to load.
  • Location type: A broad description of where the incident occurred. For example, a parking lot.
  • Location detail: Further detail on where the incident occurred. For example, for a location type of parking lot the location detail might indicate the parking lot was at an apartment building.
  • Offense: An offense is a crime but the police also track as offenses other public safety issues such as an abandoned car or a missing person in their database.
  • Offense status: When an offense is reported, based upon the outcome of an investigation, the offense falls into one of four categories:
    • Completed – A criminal offense was committed.
    • Attempted – An effort was made to commit a criminal offense but was not fully accomplished. For example, there are signs a person tried to break into a business but nothing was stolen so a burglary was only attempted, not completed.
    • Unfounded – A reported offense was found to be baseless. For example, a portable radio is reported stolen but later the owner remembers he actually lent it to a friend.
    • N/A – Not all incidents, such as a report of lost property, involve criminal offenses but they are still recorded by police.
  • Primary offense: An ICR can involve multiple offenses. For each ICR one offense is identified as the primary offense. Typically it is the most serious offense on an ICR. For ICRs with a single offense naturally the sole offense is identified as the primary offense. Primary offenses are identifed by an asterick (*) beside the sequence number.
  • Sequence number (Seq #): Since an incident can involve multiple offenses, each offense on an ICR is identifed with its own sequence number.
  • Police service area (SA): A standard police patrol area often referred to as a “beat”.
  • Small reporting area (SRA): A smaller geographic area than a police service area, the small reporting area is the most granular police response area the county tracks for police data collection.
  • Specific crime category: A more detailed classification of crime than crime category. For example, a crime category is robbery while a specific crime is a carjacking using a knife, a type of robbery.
  • Investigation Officer: The last name and initials of an officer investigating the incident when available. The officer’s employee identification number appears in parenthesis.
  • Victim/Property: Searches can be designed to look for specific victim and property statuses by clicking the appropriate Victim Injured checkbox or property status checkbox(es) beside “Property was”. Victim and property statuses appear in the results under Comments.

 

Call for Service Report Help

A call for service is a call from the public requesting police, fire, or rescue emergency or non-emergency assistance. Please note this page only searches calls for service assigned to police units. Not all police calls for service are publically searchable on this page. Click here for a list of non-searchable call for service types.

For privacy reasons, no name is information available. Similarly, only blocks or intersections where calls were reported are available, not specific street addresses.

When requesting additional information for a call for service it is helpful to provide both the CAD number and the date/time the call was received.

 

  • CAD number (CAD #): A sequential number used to identify a call for service. Computer aided dispatch (CAD) numbers are reused over time so it is important to understand they are not unique identifers.
  • Disposition: The status of a call for service falls into one of the following categories:
    • Arrest made – A suspect was apprehended but no ICR was filed.
    • Advice given – The responding officer provided guidance to the caller.
    • Cancel – The police unit response was cancelled.
    • FR300 – An accident report. An arrest may have been made.
    • Incident report – An incident crime report (ICR) was filed as a result of the call. An arrest may have been made.
    • No report – An officer responded to the call but no report was filed.
    • Other agency – An agency other than Henrico police, fire, or rescue responded to the call.
    • Other report – An administrative report such as an animal impoundment was filed.
    • Preempt – The unit responding to the call is redirected to a higher priority call enroute.
    • Unable to locate – The unit responding to the call could not find the caller.
    •  Unknown – The disposition of the call for service is not known.
  • Final call type: All calls for service are categorized by the type of call such as an accident when they are reported. Often the initial call type will prove to be mistaken. For example, a report of an accident may actually be a disabled vehicle. Using this example, “disabled vehicle” would be recorded in the police database as the final call type.
  • Magisterial district: Henrico is divided into 5 magisterial districts. To access a map of these districts click here. Note, this link requires Adobe Acrobat and may take a few minutes to load.
  • Police service area (SA): A standard police patrol area often referred to as a “beat”.
  • Small reporting area (SRA): A smaller geographic area than a police service area, the small reporting area is the most granular police response area the county tracks for police data collection.

 

Search Arrest Reports Help

To understand this report it is important to be aware of the relationship between incidents, arrests, and charges. An incident, which is identified by a unique ICR number, can involve one or more arrestee. Each arrestee for a given incident is identified by a unique arrest number ending in a 2-digit sequence number. So, for example, the arrest number 02070699902 identifies the second suspect arrested for an incident since it ends in “02″. For any given arrest there may be multiple charges. For example, a suspect can be arrested for burglary and vandalism. Each specific charge assigned to an arrest is identified by a sequence number beginning with a “C” to signify the sequence number applies to a charge.

When requesting additional information for an arrest it is helpful to provide the arrest number.

 

  • Arrest #: For each arrestee on an ICR the arrest is assigned a unique arrest number as an identifier. Note that the last 2 digits of the arrest number are a sequence number to identify each suspect arrested. So, if an arrest number ends in “02″ it identifies the second suspect arrested for an incident.
  • Crime category: A broad classification of crime, such as robbery or assault.
  • ICR number (ICR #): A unique identifier for an incident. For reporting purposes, an incident is one or more offenses committed at the same time and place by an offender or group of offenders acting in concert.
  • Sequence number (Seq #): Since an arrest can involve multiple charges each charge for a given arrest is assigned a sequence number identifier. Charge sequence numbers always begin with a “C” for charge.
  • Specific crime category: A more detailed classification of crime than crime category. For example, a crime category is robbery while a specific crime is a carjacking using a knife, a type of robbery.
  • Statute description: The federal, state, or local law specified for the charge. For detailed descriptions of Virginia statutes click here.
  • Home Address (Block) of Person Charged: The address of the person arrested at the time of their arrest. Addresses shown are not exact but are to the nearest 100 block. For example, an arrestee residing at 5405 Somewhere Street will have their address listed as 5400 Block Somewhere Street. Addresses listed as the 0 block indicate the street number is less than 100. For example, 15 Somewhere Street.